Scratchpaper Recommended Links [Ed. 0016 / Environment]

Leaves GreenLatest selection of the best stuff I’ve seen lately across the ScratchPaper focus areas of Green, Environment, Energy, Transportation, New Urbanism, including items on the new consensus on global warming, the end of the electric grid, and solar panels as the new granite countertop.  Enjoy.

Environment

Energy

Transportation

New Urbanism

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Comments

  1. Hi!
    I came across the ‘Green’ section for your blogsite. You have some great stuff on there! Rent.com has several “green blogs”, I would be happy to have you take a look to and see if there is something on there that you might find useful! http://www.rent.com/blog

    Thanks,

    Erin

  2. Not sure if you are open to reasonable discussions on the opposing side of things but I thought I would reach out none-the-less.

    Here’s an article about the benefits of fracking http://buyfracsand.net/3-undeniable-factual-reasons-to-continue-mining-frac-sand/

    I would love your feedback and rebuttal.

    • Christopher says:

      Thanks for sharing your article. Some of the assertions you make appear to be sound, but overall, fracking is still just a way to perpetuate our dependence on fossil fuels. Fossil fuels are environmentally unsound and every dollar we invest in keeping them cheap (by finding new supplies or new ways of extracting them) is like TWO DOLLARS we could have spent on job-creating, sustainable clean energy (first dollar is the lost investment, second dollar is the cost competition). Moving to a cleaner energy infrastructure is not easy, but it is not to be feared – it will have as much or more long term benefit on jobs and national security as any form of fossil fuels. If the climate changes enough to leave us competing for arable cropland and water in some remote country (as China is already doing), we are not going to have much national security. Nor are we going to have much national competitiveness if we cede our lead in green energy technologies.

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